Brunt Breaking Up with Antarctica this Year?
Posted in Incredible

Two years after the Brunt Ice Shelf seemed poised to produce a berg twice the size of New York City, the ice is still hanging on. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired this image of the Brunt Ice Shelf on January 12, 2021. These areas are stretched thin, and can be melted from above or below, making them more prone to forming rifts and eventually breaking away. The Brunt Ice Shelf appears to be in a period of instability, with cracks spreading across its surface. The detailed view shows the new rift growing away from an area known as the McDonald Ice Rumples.

The Oldest Crewed Deep Sea Submarine Just Got a Big Makeover
Posted in Incredible

In early March, a gleaming white submarine called Alvin surfaced off the Atlantic coast of North Carolina after spending the afternoon thousands of feet below the surface. For Bruce Strickrott, Alvin’s chief pilot and the leader of the expedition, these sorts of missions to the bottom of the world are a regular part of life. By the time Alvin’s makeover is wrapped up in late 2021, the storied submarine will rank among the most capable human-rated deep sea submersibles in the world. Courtesy of Woods Hole Oceanographic InstitutionTo upgrade Alvin, engineers had to tear the sub down to its metal skeleton at the National Deep Submergence Facility, a federally funded research space hosted at Woods Hole. The vessel is made almost entirely from custom components designed to withstand the uniquely hostile environment in the deep ocean, and the regular teardowns ensure that everything is in good shape.

Sands and Mats at Padre Island
Posted in Incredible

An astronaut on the International Space Station (ISS) shot this photograph of a portion of Padre Island, a long barrier island along the southern Texas coast. For this reason, the beach appears wider and extends farther seaward on South Padre Island. Stretching north from the channel, Padre Island National Seashore protects nearly 80 miles (130 kilometers) of beaches for nature and recreation. North and South Padre Islands are well known for attracting tourists and beachgoers, but they have also intrigued scientists. Extensive microbial mats—multi-layered sheets of microorganisms such as bacteria—take advantage of this natural protection and thrive in the protected tidal flats along the backshore of Padre Island.

WHOI establishes new fund to accelerate microplastics innovation
Posted in Incredible

Early microplastics research by WHOI scientists was mostly funded through small grants that allowed them to explore very limited facets of the issue. In 2017 and 2018, WHOI awarded Catalyst Funds—an incubator program funded by private donations—to form the Marine Microplastics Initiative. With the backing of a handful of family foundations, WHOI is launching a Marine Microplastics Innovation Accelerator to help drive innovation and support projects that will have the most impact. “Currently, there are many more questions than answers about the fate and impacts of microplastics in the ocean,” he says. “The growing support from private foundations is critical in enabling the interdisciplinary, cutting-edge research that is needed to understand and solve this global problem.”

Grain Burn, Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland by John Brooks
Posted in Incredible

Picture StoryI would not normally venture into Scotland during the winter months as I dont like cold weather and i dont ski. On this occasion however i needed to attend an important international conference and was even participating so no excuse would be accepted for my absence. When I skirted Penicuik and just before reaching \"Grain Burn\" to the right of the road i espied a frozen are of flooded field with a convenient parking layby immediately nearby. There was not much light and needed a wide aperture with slowish shutter speed and took care to avoid camera shake. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.

Half Dome, Yosemite, California, USA by Fereshte Faustini
Posted in Incredible

Picture StoryOne calm, crisp cold morning, I found myself basking in the quiet of Yosemite Valley. I had been in Yosemite National Park for a few days to take advantage of the Sierra winter storm for some moodier photography opportunities. The scene before me was wondrous: Yosemite's majestic Half Dome, peeking through the snow-covered valley, completely sun-kissed, golden, and luminous, reflecting gently on the half-frozen water below. This is why Yosemite continues to be one of the most incredible National Parks. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.

Hocking Hills State Park, Ohio, USA by Roy Goldsberry
Posted in Incredible

Picture StoryI have been to visit Hocking Hills State Park near Logan, Ohio several times. There are several, separated areas that make up the park, and we decided to start with Old Mans Cave the next morning. That had us starting at the upper falls end, and then following the stream past the cave and on to the lower falls. Many pathways and stairs were fully covered by ice, and we had ice cleats for our boots. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.

Frosty Morning, Welburn, England by Richard Burdon
Posted in Incredible

We’d had a cold spell and the temperature had been below zero all week, but all my efforts to capture a winter scene had eluded me so far. This feeling of elation must be the same sort of emotion film workers experience when they see an image appear in their developing tray. I love the delicacy of the frost on the tree and the background just visible in the morning mist gives me that separation and simplicity I was looking for. Two hours after this shot was taken, it thawed and never froze again for the remainder of the year. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.

Crater Lake, Klamath County, Oregon, USA by Gary Weyandt
Posted in Incredible

Picture StoryWhile taking a short hike on the Discovery Point Trail at Crater Lake National Park, reflections in the water provided the perfect opportunity to capture the majesty of the park in winter. The glassy water reflected the island, crater rim, and sky like a mirror. The edge of a snow drift helped frame the scene, clearly announcing this was winter. Crater Lake is magical in winter when the park is nearly deserted. Create your own portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 700,000 members and followers.

Tracing Changes in Ozone-Depleting Chemicals
Posted in Incredible

For more than 30 years, nations have been working to protect Earth’s stratospheric ozone layer by banning the new production and trade of ozone-depleting substances. Part of that effort has included tracking the atmospheric concentration of such chemicals. In the 1970 and 80s, scientists discovered that chemicals widely used in refrigerants and insulating foams were rising into the stratosphere. Even after production ceased, scientists still expected chemicals like CFC-11 to continue leaking from existing products for years, but at a gradually declining rate. In 2018, NOAA first reported that atmospheric CFC-11 had declined less than expected, hinting that something had changed.

Free Feature • A Guide To Winter Landscape Photography
Posted in Incredible

Follow us Follow usWith winter approaching fast on the upper hemisphere, landscape photographers are looking forward to getting out there and creating their masterpieces. Mark Bauer helped us put together the ultimate guide to winter landscape photography Mark BauerIf you asked non-photographers what their favourite season is, it is likely that few would say winter. Yet, a huge number of photographers name it as their favourite time of year for landscape photography. At its best, winter delivers a wealth of photographic opportunities, including frosty sunrises, colourful sunsets and dramatic, stormy skies. The weather in winter can be unpredictable to say the least, and it can be daunting heading out into the cold on a freezing winter morning.

How WHOI scientists once looked for the lost city of Atlantis
Posted in Incredible

That city, known today as the fabled lost continent of Atlantis, has gripped the human imagination ever since. It would only be fitting that when a new oceanographic institution began 90 years ago in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, it would have the drive and research capacity to investigate whether this city actually existed. It was 1931, soon after the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s inception, when the field of ocean science was still relatively new. But after more than a month at sea and their other research projects were completed, the crew returned home empty-handed. No mention of any new findings regarding Atlantis can be found in their logbooks.

Long Valley, Idaho, USA by Shane Davila
Posted in Incredible

As I drove along a road in the country side I spied these willows all alone in the distance. I need to look harder but not necessarily with my eyes but instead with my vision. Recognizing these elements as components to my vision the scene called to me, urging me to find it. It is often the simplest of things that can speak with the loudest voice as this simple scene did to me. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

Kubota Garden, Seattle, WA, USA by Joe Campisi
Posted in Incredible

Picture StoryKubota Garden is a beautiful Japanese garden located in Seattle. It's a beautiful place to visit anytime of the year, especially stunning in the fall. But maybe the most special time to visit is when a rare Seattle snowfall blankets the garden. I've always wanted to visit and photograph the garden in snow since I saw an image in a book about Seattle over a decade ago. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

Krafla, Myvatn, Reykjahlid, Iceland by Dominiek Cottem
Posted in Incredible

Picture StoryThe geothermal area of Krafla seen from the edge of the Viti crater (North East of Iceland). Outside of expectations, it already started to snow in the north-east of the country at the end of September. A combination of frozen snow and the ice made it a surprisingly tough hike on very slippery slopes. The ever-changing light in Iceland is one of the elements that make this country so unique for landscape photographers. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

Colorado River, Moab, Utah, USA by Bruce Hucko
Posted in Incredible

Picture StoryThe high desert of the Colorado Plateau experiences all seasons, and nothing, to me, validates how cold it can get as when the Colorado River freezes over. I mean bank to bank and almost thick enough to walk across (but don't try it). When conditions are right it usually takes a few weeks of prolonged cold for the ice to form. From my vantage point the side of the highway I looked down to see full ice, broken in a few places, yet still frozen bank to bank. Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada by Susan Dykstra
Posted in Incredible

Picture StoryIn my home town of Thunder Bay we rarely get this beautiful hoarfrost in the valley. On this particular day it was amazing to see that it was so thick with frost and lasted most of the day. As I lie on my back in the snow I was looking for pleasing compositions of the white branches covered with frost against the blue of the sky. Hey VisitorDid you know that now we offer a VIP membership? Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

Canyonlands NP, Utah, USA by Peter Boehringer
Posted in Incredible

Everybody wants to catch the moment with the orange glow on the arch plus a sunburst in the frame to boot. Let’s be honest, it is a cool shot and you can’t blame people who want to witness and photograph the moment. The only requirement is having a wide angle lens and drive up to the trailhead very early in the morning. BUT, what if contrary to everybody else who is using a wide angle lens you get out your 200 mm lens? Create your personal portfolio page and let us share it monthly to over 400,000 members and followers.

The eccentric scientist behind the ‘gold standard’ COVID-19 test
Posted in Incredible

“If you're doing any sort of DNA studies, PCR is just the thing you do,” says pioneering genomics researcher Eric Green. In this process, scientists put their desired genetic sequence into the genomes of bacteria, which then divided and replicated both themselves and the introduced genetic code. After that fateful weekend in his cabin, Mullis returned to work at Cetus Corporation in Emeryville, California. Meanwhile, Shirley Kwok, a scientist at Cetus, was applying PCR to study HIV but was getting annoyed with the process. White ended up running the PCR division there, along with over a hundred Cetus scientists he took with him.

Unexpected life is discovered in a deep, dark Antarctic world
Posted in Incredible

Image: British Antarctic SurveyThe yellow star shows where scientists observed life under the ice shelf in this study. \"These animals discovered under the ice shelf are probably no exception,\" said Aronson, who had no involvement with the research. And in the deep sea, which is mostly unexplored, finding novel, stunning life is the norm. And the deep sea tells us to expect surprises. \"Because Antarctica and the deep sea are so unexplored, of course we should expect the unexpected,\" said Aronson.

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