Study reconstructs ancient storms to help predict changes in world’s tropical cyclone hotspot

Study reconstructs ancient storms to help predict changes in world’s tropical cyclone hotspot

“Atmospheric circulation changes due to modern, human-induced climate warming are opposite of the circulation changes due to the Little Ice Age,” notes Bramante. “So we can expect to see the opposite effect in the deep tropics—a decrease in tropical cyclones close to the equator. He plans to expand the Marshall Islands study westward to the Philippines to study where tropical cyclones have historically formed and how climate conditions influence a storm’s track and intensity. Better understanding of how storms behaved under previous conditions will help scientists understand what causes changes in tropical cyclone activity and aid people living in coastal communities prepare for extreme weather in the future, he said. We play a leading role in ocean observation, and operate the most extensive suite of data-gathering platforms in the world.

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